History

Rubrique : Ryder Cup 2018

The Ryder Cup has been exciting the golf world for almost one hundred years. Starting as the vision of a garden seeds salesman in the 1920s, gaining momentum with the participation of Ballesteros at the end of the 80’s and looking to 2018 when the Ryder will make its historic return to the Continent, in France at the Golf National, the Ryder Cup has written some of the best pages in golfing history. 

The Ryder Cup, one of the last great sporting events was first contested in 1927. First informal matches were played in 1921 at Gleneagles, Scotland, just before the 2,000 Guineas Match Play Championship, with the British soundly defeating the U.S. Team, 9-3. 

Another unofficial match occurred before The 1926 Open Golf Championship at Wentworth, and this time, the Americans' defeat was 13 1/2 to 1 1/2.
Before the matches at Wentworth, English Samuel Ryder who was a seed merchant and entrepreneur and a member of the appreciative gallery, had engaged the British star Abe Mitchell as his personal golf tutor. Mitchell beat the reigning Open Champion Jim Barnes, 8 and 7, in the singles, and then partnered with George Duncan in the foursomes to beat Hagen and Barnes, 9 and 8.
After the matches, Ryder had tea with British Team Members George Duncan and Mitchell. Also joining them were Hagen and American team-mate Emmett French. Duncan suggested Ryder provide a trophy and encourage the establishment of matches on a regular basis. Ryder agreed at once and commissioned the design of the gold chalice that bears his name and Mitchell's likeness on the top.
The inaugural Ryder Cup was played in 1927 at Worcester Country Club, Massachusetts. The United States Team defeated their counterparts from Great Britain in that historic first match, 9 1/2 -2 1/2.
The first U.S. Ryder Cup Team was captained by Hagen, a charter Member of The PGA of America. Only American-born players were allowed to join the Team, according to a Selection Committee ruling, April 5, 1927, in Chicago.
The British Team was originally set with Mitchell as Captain, but he remained home due to his illness. Ted Ray took over the duties.
With the outbreak of World War II, The Ryder Cup was suspended from 1939-45, and the U.S. retained the trophy from its 1937 victory.
The Ryder Cup resumed with the seventh meeting to the two teams in 1947 at Portland Golf Club, Oregon.
Europeans Join the Fight for the Cup
In 1973, The Ryder Cup was contested for the first time in Scotland at historic Muirfield. The PGA of Great Britain altered its selection procedure by having eight players chosen from a year-long points system and four by invitation.
The introduction of players from continental Europe into The Ryder Cup fold in 1979 marked a new chapter in the history of the biennial competition and after years of U.S. domination the tide started to turn.
The foundations were laid as far back as 1971 when John Jacobs, the first Director General of The European Tour, had the vision to realise that the future lay in Europe. As The European Tour grew into a cosmopolitan mix of players from all nationalities, particularly from the continent, the logical step was to include these players in The Ryder Cup and make the matches Europe versus America.
During The 1977 Ryder Cup at Royal Lytham & St Annes, Jack Nicklaus approached the PGA of Great Britain about the urgency to improve the competitive level of the contest. The issue had been discussed earlier the same day by both Past The PGA of America President Henry Poe and British PGA President Lord Derby. Nicklaus pitched his ideas, adding: "It is vital to widen the selection procedures if The Ryder Cup is to continue to enjoy its past prestige."
The changes in team selection procedure were approved by descendants of the Samuel Ryder family along with The PGA of America. The major change was expanding selection procedures to include players from the European Tournament Players' Division, and "that European Members be entitled to play on the team."
This meant that professional players on the European Tournament Players' Division, the forerunner to The European Tour we have today, from continental Europe would be eligible to play in The Ryder Cup. The recommendation and succeeding approval of the new selection process followed another American victory at Royal Lytham & St. Annes in 1977.
The first Ryder Cup under the expanded European selection format was played at The Greenbrier in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. The first two Europeans to make the overseas squad were two Spaniards - Severiano Ballesteros and Antonio Garrido. Ballesteros went on to become one of the all-time winners in The Ryder Cup. He has a record of won 20, lost 12 and halved five and has earned 22 1/2 points in 37 Ryder Cup matches.
The move to include the continental players was a major step in upgrading The Ryder Cup. The U.S. had won all but one outing from 1959 to 1977, the exception being the tied match in a memorable duel in 1969 at Royal Birkdale in Southport, England.
Expanding the selection procedure to include Europeans provided a much greater pool of talent from which to the team.
The effect of The European Tour, with its varying types of golf courses, climates, food, language and customs, was to produce players of unprecedented durability. They possessed the technique and confidence to deal with all course situations and make The Ryder Cup one of the most compelling events in world sport.
Ryder Cup Format Changes
From the beginning of the series through 1959, The Ryder Cup competition was comprised of four foursomes (alternate shot) matches on one day and eight singles matches on the other day, each of 36 holes.
The format was changed in 1961, to provide four 18-hole foursomes matches the morning of the first day, four more foursomes that afternoon, eight 18-hole singles the morning of the second day and eight more singles that afternoon. One point was at stake in each match, so the total number of points was doubled to 24. In 1963, fourball (better-ball) matches were added for the first time, boosting the total number of points available to 32.
The format was altered again in 1977, this time with five foursomes on opening day, five four-ball matches on the second day, and ten singles matches on the final day. This reduced the total points to 20.
In 1979, when the Great Britain & Ireland Team was expanded to include players from Continental Europe, the format was revised to provide four fourball and four foursomes matches on each of the first two days and 12 singles matches on the third day. The total points awarded were 28. This format continues today.
The Ryder Cup was interrupted for the second time in history following the September 11, 2001, attack upon America. Some eight days following the tragedy, The 2001 Ryder Cup was rescheduled to the following year in 2002, with all future competitions conducted in even-numbered years.

France to host the  2018 Ryder Cup at the Golf National
At the end of 2008, when the next two events to be played in Europe had already been attributed to Wales and Scotland  in 2010 and 2014, the Ryder Cup Europe representatives announced their decision to stage the 2018 game in Continental Europe. Countries hoping to host the event had until 28th February 2009 to put in their bid. Germany, Sweden, Portugal, the Netherlands, Spain and France all submitted their official candidacies. France, supported by the Fédération Française de Golf, chose to make its candidacy file official in the Senate on the 29th April; More than one year later on the 17th May 2011 the verdict fell. France will be the host country for the 2018 Ryder Cup.
The French and the Ryder Cup 
Thomas Levet was the second Frenchman after Jean Van de Velde in 1999 to take his place in the European team of the Ryder Cup in 2004, and the first Frenchman to be a member of the winning European team, before Victor Dubuisson in 2014 at Gleneagles. 

Vidéos
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Les Potions du Druide : épisode 8

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Améliorez votre jeu grâce aux conseils de l'entraîneur fédéral Benoît Ducoulombier ! Coach de Romain Langasque, Julien Quesne ou encore Gwladys Nocera, le « Druide » vous donne ses potions magiques pour votre golf ! Dans ce huitième épisode, tapez des balles au practice comme les pros !

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Club des partenaires frances 2018 Ryder Cup 2018